Civil War news you can use: Disunion, and talks at CUNY

Posted: February 1, 2011 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Remember, a month or so back, when The Daily Show did that piece about Southern secession celebrations? Well, that’s all over and done with, for the moment, thankfully.  I’m not going into that right now, and while I acknowledge the complexities of everyone’s motivations, I’ll still abide by what I said in that earlier post. I’ll also skip over the notorious Lincoln forgery that was exposed a short while back: you can read about it at the National Archives.

HOWEVER, there are some really good popular and academic items coming up, and I think people should know about them.  The first is The New York Times‘ blog Disunion, which is setting out to post something daily concerning The Civil War.  This is not your typical blog; the posts are long, detailed, insightful, and often backed by some impressive research.  The contributors are prominent journalists, archivists, and academics.  This is something you’ll want to check often as the year progresses.

The other major item of note that I’ve come across is the series of talks and seminars presented by the American Social History Project at CUNY, on the following dates:

DID THE REAL WAR EVER GET IN THE BOOKS? NEW SCHOLARSHIP ON THE CIVIL WAR
Thursday, February 3, 2011, at 6:00 pm

THE GREAT DIVIDE? CIVIL WAR MYTHS AND MISINFORMATION
Tuesday, April 5, 2011, at 6:00 pm

IS THERE ANYTHING MORE TO SEE? CIVIL WAR PHOTOGRAPHY AND HISTORY
Thursday, November 3, 2011, at 6:00 pm

And via H-Net, here are the details of the first session:

DID THE REAL WAR EVER GET IN THE BOOKS?
New Scholarship and the Civil War

Thursday February 3rd, 6:00 pm
Martin Segal Theatre
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
365 Fifth Avenue (at 34th Street), New York City

* Gregory Downs, City College of New York, CUNY
* Bruce Levine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
* Stephanie McCurry, University of Pennsylvania
* James Oakes, The Graduate Center, CUNY

From battlefield sagas to biographies to historical monographs, no subject
in U.S. history has been more exhaustively written about than the Civil
War. Yet historians continue to offer new approaches and sources of
evidence for the social, political, intellectual, and cultural history of
the era. This panel of historians will discuss recent scholarship that
addresses such issues as how ideas about gender influenced politics and
society; the sustained and decisive actions of African Americans (both
enslaved and free)to secure emancipation; and the currents of dissent that
roiled the Confederacy.

This is the first program in “Still Hazy After All These Years,” a series
of free public panels marking the sesquicentennial of the start of the
U.S.
Civil War, sponsored by the American Social History Project/Center for
Media and Learning and the Ph.D. Program in History at The Graduate
Center, City University of New York.

This program is supported by a grant from the New York Council for the
Humanities.

 

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