I have been getting a lot of CFPs from Kalamazoo sessions recently, so here they are below. Good luck in preparing for another year of medieval fun and scholarship!

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“In a Word, Philology: Etymology, Lexicography, Semantics, and More in
Germanic.”

ICMS 2013, Kalamazoo

Now in its fourth year, this session will continue to draw on the full
spectrum of Germanic philological and linguistic studies, including
but not limited to Old and Middle High German, Old and Middle English,
Old Saxon, Middle Dutch, Old Frisian, Old Norse-Icelandic, Gothic,
Runic, comparative studies, Proto-Germanic, and Germanic within
Indo-European. Literary studies with a strong focus on language,
Editionswissenschaft, and/or linguistics will also be considered.

Topics are completely open. This session serves as a broad forum for
new research in all Germanic languages and dialects, and papers
focused on under-represented languages at Kalamazoo are particularly
welcome.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words to Adam Oberlin
(oberl024@umn.edu) by September 15, 2012.

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“Reconceptualizing the Literature of Late Medieval/Early Modern Scotland,” a special session at the

48th International Congress on Medieval Studies
Kalamazoo, MI
May 9-12, 2013

We are interested in seeing proposals on any topic concerning the still under-studied literature of late medieval and/or early modern Scotland, but especially those that address the challenges to conventional periodization that the authors of this notoriously “in-between” period represent (roughly 1425-1525, but with no strict boundaries on either side). Papers might focus on any of the following areas, although they are certainly not restricted to them:

-new approaches to periodization
-humanism and classicism in Scottish vs. English contexts
-the idea of “The Northern Renaissance,” broadly understood
-questions of historiography and nation
-the influence of Scottish texts on English authors of the fifteenth and sixteenth century (e.g. John Skelton)

We also enthusiastically welcomes papers on any of the authors usually grouped together as “Scottish Chaucerians” — the poet of the _Kingis Quair_, Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, and Gavin Douglas, among others — although proposals for papers that do not focus primarily on the influence of Chaucer will be read with special interest.

By September 15, 2012, please submit a one-page abstract and completed Participant Information Form to Tim Miller at tmille17@nd.edu (http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html)

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“In Praise of Folie: The Uses of Madness in Medieval French Literature”
Special Session, 48th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI
May 9-12, 2013
Existing scholarship on madness in medieval (mostly English) literature is dedicated predominantly to typological schematization or to clinical descriptions of medieval madness, either in terms of medieval theories of insanity or from a more modern, often Lacanian, perspective.  More properly literary accounts, notably Sylvia Huot’s excellent Madness in Medieval French Literature (2003), tend to privilege the ways in which madness constructs, deconstructs, and problematizes individual and collective identities and their articulation with each other.  Without excluding these issues, this panel seeks to build on such readings by paying closer attention to the function of madness–or madnesses, for they are strikingly heterogeneous–as a narrative device, or, better, as a mechanism for creating and managing avenues of narrative and discursive possibility in all domains of Old French and Provençal fiction and lyric poetry.
Of particular interest is the connection between insanity as gender trouble (a much-emphasized dimension of medieval literary madness) and insanity as genre trouble.  Does the “liminal” state marked by madness permit, while also perhaps concealing and legitimating, textual forays into the ambiguous borderlands where generic conventions and possibilities mingle and interact with generative results?  Does the madman’s or madwoman’s discursive and embodied performance enable passages, either temporary or permanent, between overdetermined systems of representation and ethical evaluation, that is, between various ways of reading and being read?  How do characters, readers, and texts register and respond to such mad play?  Pushing this line of inquiry to its limits, can madness be a formal or ontological as well as a psychological phenomenon?  Might texts themselves be read as “mad”, or, like Shakespeare’s Hamlet, “mad in craft”?
Please send abstracts of approx. 250 words to Lucas Wood (lucasw@sas.upenn.edu) as soon as possible.  Official deadline is Sept. 15, but participation in the session is limited.

 

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The Medieval Research Consortium of UC Davis invites submission of proposals for the following panel for the 48th International Congress on Medieval Studies occurring at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan from May 9-12, 2013. Please submit a proposal of 300 words with a completed Participant Information Form (available here) for consideration in these panels. You may submit proposals via e-mail or mail a hard copy of your proposal for consideration; all proposals are due by September 15, 2012.

Panel contact:

Katherine Leveling
Department of English
One Shields Avenue
University of California
Davis, CA 95616

Panel description:
Not Your Moder’s Medievalism: Rethinking the Medieval through its Self-Imagination

This panel aims to contribute to a growing body of work that explores medievalism through the medieval period’s own eyes. Rather than understanding medievalism solely through later periods’ constructions of the medieval, most commonly those of the 19th century, this panel is interested in the way the medieval participated in its own self-conscious creation. Questions explored might include: How did the medieval think about itself? How did it shape, comment on, or contribute to our present senses of the medieval? How might the medieval’s self-consciousness influence later instantiations of medievalism? How did the medieval parody itself? How did nostalgia function in the medieval period? This panel is interested not only in medieval English literature, but also continental literatures and literatures across languages and geographies.

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The Medieval Research Consortium of UC Davis invites submission of proposals for the following panel for the 48th International Congress on Medieval Studies occurring at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan from May 9-12, 2013. Please submit a proposal of 300 words with a completed Participant Information Form (available here) for consideration in these panels. You may submit proposals via e-mail or mail a hard copy of your proposal for consideration; all proposals are due by September 15, 2012.

Panel contact:
Katherine Leveling
Department of English
One Shields Avenue
University of California
Davis, CA 95616

Panel description:

Temporalities and Medieval Drama

This panel in interested in the ways medieval drama helps us think about temporalities within its own period and across others. How does medieval drama incorporate contemporary political, social, spiritual, and gendered concerns within or through temporal disruptions or cross-temporal dynamics? Papers might explore these questions through audience orientations to temporalities, temporalities within dramatic texts, and performance contexts and interactions.  Papers might also trouble distinctions between drama in the medieval and early modern, interrogating how temporal relations within and among these literary and historical periods helps us understand them together.

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AVISTA Sessions at ICMS, Kalamazoo, MI, 2013

AVISTA, the Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Technology, Science, and Art in the Middle Ages, is pleased to announce FOUR sessions at the International Congress for Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo next year, which will be held from 9-12 May 2013:

  • New Studies of the North Transept of Reims I: Archeology & Architecture
  • New Studies of the North Transept of Reims II: Sculpture
  • Metal Production & Design
  • Metals in Architecture

In addition, we are in negotiations to have a live iron smelting demonstration at the ICMS, likely on Saturday.  Once details are finalized, we will be accepting volunteers to assist the smith as smelting apprentices.

Full information on the sessions is below and for further information and to see past AVISTA activities at the ICMS, please see www.avista.org under ‘Conferences’.

In addition, we encourage anyone wishing to present on these topics or any other on medieval technology, science, and art at the Leeds International Medieval Congress (1-4 July 2013) to contact the president of AVISTA as well.

AVISTA Grants and Prizes

Staring in 2012, AVISTA will be making an annual Villard de Honnecourt Award for the outstanding paper by a graduate student in an AVISTA session.  This award, which comes with a $500 honorarium and will also lead to an article in the AVISTA Forum Journal, is intended to further young talent in the study of medieval technology, science, and art.  Nominations for this award should be made by a current AVISTA member on behalf of the proposer; for more information please contact the president of AVISTA.

The Society is also pleased to announce that for 2013, up to three $500 grants-in-aid are available to graduate students or independent scholars to defray costs of attending the ICMS at Kalamazoo.  Indication of the intent to apply for one of these grants should be made at the time of submitting an abstract to the session organizers.  Decisions will be made in Fall 2012.

Reims Sessions

Organizer: Jennifer M. Feltman, Florida State University

Presider: Nancy Wu, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The design and building chronology of the north transept façade of Reims Cathedral continues to be one of the knottiest problems in this building’s history.  Even to a casual viewer, the lack of uniformity is apparent and suggests that numerous changes were made in the course of its construction.  This raises questions about the function of the portals and the reception of their sculptures that are further complicated by the fact that a cloister originally encumbered the façade, preventing the viewing of its three portals and their sculptures as a whole. Scholars since the time of Hans Kunze (1912) have debated whether or not some of the sculptures were originally intended for an abandoned plan for the west façade. While current opinion has tilted in favor of the north transept as their originally planned location, no consensus has been achieved.  Perhaps most importantly, new studies of the sculptures need to incorporate the findings of recent archeological excavations and architectural studies that have yet to be published.  Although the Cathedral of Reims has been the focus of three symposia over the past twelve years, (The 2001 Symposium at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the 2004 International Colloque in Reims, and the 2011 International Colloque in Reims), the north transept has not received sustained attention through the type of focused sessions that AVISTA will organize.

The first session will address the archeology of the site and the architecture of the façade.  Of special interest are papers that investigate the relation of the cloister to the façade, the construction of the façade, and papers that shed light on the contemporary use of these portals in the thirteenth century.  The second session will build upon the first by focusing on the sculptures of the three portals.  We welcome papers addressing issues of iconography, reception, and the re-use and integration of previous sculptures.  It is our hope that these sessions will create an interdisciplinary and international dialog among current scholars working on the north transept, encouraging fresh investigations of the chronology, function, and reception of the north transept portals.  Papers from the two Reims sessions will be considered for publication in the AVISTA Ashgate Series.

• Please send proposals and inquiries for the Reims sessions to Jennifer Feltman, jfeltman@fsu.edu no later than 15 September 2012.  Along with your proposal, please include a completed Participant Information Form: http://www.wmich.edu/~medinst/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF

Please note that these sessions may fill quickly, so you are encouraged to contact her as soon as possible.

Metals Sessions

Organizer: Steven A. Walton, Michigan Technological University

Presiders: Steven A. Walton and Carol Neuman deVegvar, Ohio Wesleyan University

Metals were both the underpinning of medieval technology and architecture, but also rare, expensive, and technically one of the most difficult materials to create and use in that period. Although arcane theories about metal production and design are often woefully overblown, the specific working methods and details that were passed as craft knowledge were abstract, obscure, and often difficult to record textually, visually, or even at times, in practice.  AVISTA will run two sessions next year at ICMS looking at the creation of metals and the design of metal objects.  We hope to offer a wide range of understanding from the smelting or iron to the design and manufacture of metal objects.  We welcome proposals for historically-grounded recreations, textually-based analyses, or meta-level papers on the meaning or motion of metals in the medieval world.

For these sessions we would consider papers on ferrous, non-ferrous, and precious metals and hope to encourage scholars to engage in a dialogue with scholars from the history of technology, art history, material culture studies, and ecclesiastical, domestic, or economic history.  We hope to have speakers on a range of objects (everything from ore carts, furnaces, and ingots to hinges, chalices, weapons, locks and keys, book clasps, and so on – from the mundane to the elite and everything in between), but on all of them as metal objects, rather than as the specific object in question.  We hope to foster a broader understanding of metals in the Middle Ages, from mine to use.

• Please send proposals and inquiries for the metals sessions to Steven Walton, sawalton@mtu.edu no later than 15 September 2012.   Along with your proposal, please include a completed Participant Information Form: http://www.wmich.edu/~medinst/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF

Please note that these sessions are strictly limited to six papers in total and may fill quickly, so you are encouraged to contact him as soon as possible.

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MONSTERS I: Haunting the Middle Ages
Organizer: Asa Simon Mittman, California State University-Chico; Sarah
Alison Miller, Duquesne University

This panel proposes to explore those monstrous figures that haunt the
borders between the living and the dead: ghosts, revenants, animated
corpses and skeletons. What do these figures reveal about the porous
boundaries between life and death, soul and body? What do they communicate
about the relationship between haunting, trauma and memory? How is
haunting associated with space, whether that space be a geographical
location, a physical structure, a fantasized realm, or human
consciousness? How were these figures depicted in art and material
culture? How might monster studies be considered a haunted domain? How
might the Middle Ages be considered a haunted age?

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Asa Simon Mittman
(asmittman@csuchico.edu) or Sarah Alison Miller (millers2578@duq.edu).
Also, please include a completed Participant Information Form:
http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF).
Deadline for submissions to this session: September 15. Any papers not
included in this session will be forwarded to the Congress Committee for
possible inclusion in the General Sessions. Note, paper proposals will
appear on the Mearcstapa blog: http://medievalmonsters.blogspot.com/

MONSTERS II: Down to the skin: Images of Flaying in the Middle Ages
Organizers: Larissa Tracy, Longwood University and Asa Simon Mittman,
California State University-Chico

Presider: Larissa Tracy

>From images of Saint Bartholomew holding his skin in his arms, to scenes
of demons flaying the damned within the mouth of hell, to grisly execution
in Havelok the Dane, to laws that prescribed it as a punishment for
treason, this session explores the gruesome, even monstrous, practice of
skin removal庸laying擁n the Middle Ages. This session proposes to examine
the widely diverse examples of this grisly practice, and explore the
layered responses to skin-removal in art, history, literature, manuscript
studies and law. How common was this punishment in practice? How does art
reflect spiritual response? How is flaying, in any form, used to further
political or religious goals? The papers in this session will literally
get beneath the skin of medieval sensibilities regarding punishment and
sacrifice in a nuanced discussion of medieval flaying.

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Asa Simon Mittman
(asmittman@csuchico.edu) or Larissa (Kat) Tracy (kattracy@comcast.net).
Also, please include a completed Participant Information Form:
http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF).
Deadline for submissions to this session: September 15. Any papers not
included in this session will be forwarded to the Congress Committee for
possible inclusion in the General Sessions. Note, paper proposals will
appear on the Mearcstapa blog: http://medievalmonsters.blogspot.com/

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